Dr. Anna Ignaczewska MD

Hill Creek Pediatrics

708-873-1888

10773 163rd Pl
 Orland Park, IL 60467

Our Location


Hill Creek Pediatrics
10773 163rd Pl
Orland Park, Illinois 60467
Phone: 708-873-1888

Patient Education

Anna Ignaczewska would like to be your partner in health care. Feel free to ask your questions and share your concerns with us. We will work with you to develop a wellness program for the care and treatment you need.

We welcome you to our practice and look forward to caring for you.

Anna Ignaczewska provides a full range of medical services including the following:


ADHD in Children

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic condition that affects children, with symptoms often continuing into adulthood. Common symptoms of ADHD include inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. ADHD affects the behavior of children both at home and in school. According to the Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately eleven percent of children in the United States are diagnosed with ADHD. Boys are more commonly diagnosed with this condition than girls. Children with ADHD often struggle in school, have poor self-esteem and may be at an increased risk for drug and alcohol abuse as they get older. With treatment, however, most people with ADHD can lead successful and productive lives. ...


Read More...

Asthma

Asthma is a condition in which the lungs and air passages become inflamed and constricted, interfering with normal breathing. During the first stage of an asthmatic response, inhaled allergens or other irritants cause the airways to constrict. During the second stage, an inflammatory response causes the airways to swell, and fill with thickened, sticky mucus. During an attack, patients have increasing difficulty in breathing, and usually make the wheezing sound typically associated with asthma. Although life-threatening, asthma can usually be well-controlled with medication. ...


Read More...

Athletic Stress

While physical exercise has proven to be a powerful tool in stress management, athletic endeavors can create stress of their own. A certain amount of stress is inherent in competitive sports, but managing athletic stress is necessary in maintaining physical and mental fitness. Stressors involved in athletic involvement include: ...


Read More...

Autism

Autism, or autism spectrum disorder (ASD), encompasses a range of pervasive developmental disorders. These disorders vary in degree from mild forms like Asperger's syndrome to severe impairment.

Autism is characterized by difficulties with communication and social interaction and by repetitive behavior patterns. The disorder has become very common, occurring in more than 1 percent of children. Autism is four times more likely to occur in males. Besides Asperger's syndrome, there are several other types of ASD, including pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, childhood disintegrative disorder, and Rett's syndrome. ...


Read More...

Bronchitis

Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, which carry air in and out of the lungs during respiration. There are two types of bronchitis: acute and chronic. Acute bronchitis is common, occurring frequently as a complication of a cold or other respiratory infection. Chronic bronchitis, however, is less common and more serious. A person is considered to have the chronic form when the bronchitis lasts longer, up to several months, and occurs more frequently, two or more times a year. Chronic bronchitis may be a precursor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). ...


Read More...

Chickenpox

Chickenpox, caused by the varicella-zoster virus, is a highly contagious childhood disease which causes a red, itchy rash of small blisters all over the body. The rash typically first appears on the trunk and then spreads to the face and limbs. The illness can be serious in babies, pregnant women and people with weakened immune systems. Previously considered an inevitable childhood disease, the illness is now far less common since a chickenpox vaccine has been developed and is normally administered to all young children. With very few exceptions, children in the United States must be vaccinated against chicken pox before registering to attend day care or school. Most frequently, children have been given their second and final dose of chickenpox vaccine by the time they are 6 years old, but if necessary they can be vaccinated later on. ...


Read More...

Childhood Obesity

Children between the ages of 2 to 19 years are diagnosed as obese when their body mass index, or BMI is greater than or equal to the 95th percentile. The body mass index takes into consideration both height and weight and while it is not a perfect measurement, it is a good indicator of body fat. Children will tend to have different amounts of body fat at different points in time, especially during growth periods, and the healthy range for BMI will vary based on age and gender. Children who are obese have too much body fat according to the BMI index and are at a weight that is greater than what is considered healthy for their height. ...


Read More...

The Common Cold

A common cold is a viral infection that affects the upper respiratory tract. The common cold also affects the nose and throat and may be caused by different viruses. Symptoms of the common cold normally last about one week but may last longer in children, the elderly, and in individuals with other underlying conditions or illnesses. The common cold is one of the main reasons people visit the doctor each year. ...


Read More...

Concussion

A concussion is a common type of brain injury most often caused by a direct blow to the head or sudden head movement that causes temporary brain malfunction. When the head is hit unexpectedly, the brain can move and hit the skull, affecting memory, judgment, reflexes, speech, balance and coordination. A concussion may also be caused by a sports related injury, a motor vehicle accident or from being violently shaken. Most concussions are considered mild injuries, and people usually fully recover from this condition. ...


Read More...

Failure to Thrive

A child whose height and weight does not fall within the normal limits of children of comparable age and gender is diagnosed with failure to thrive. There may a great many causes for this condition, ranging from genetic defects to disease conditions to environmental inadequacies. Any child who fails to thrive needs to be thoroughly examined physically and if necessary, the home environment may be investigated and evaluated. ...


Read More...

Immunizations

While infants are protected from certain diseases at birth because of antibodies passed on to them from the mother, this maternal protection is only temporary. Continuing immunity against many diseases can be achieved through vaccinations, most often administered as injections, but sometimes administered orally or nasally. Vaccinations use small amounts of killed or weakened microorganisms that cause the targeted diseases. Introducing these altered pathogens into the body assists the immune system in developing antibodies as if it were fighting off the actual disease. These antibodies provide the patient with long-term protection. ...


Read More...

Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, sometimes referred to as juvenile idiopathic arthritis, is an autoimmune disorder that causes symptoms of arthritis in children. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis affects the lining of the joints and commonly affects children under the age of 16, causing pain, stiffness and swelling in the joints. Symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may come and go, and may last for a short time or for years. This condition may lead to growth problems and eye inflammation in some children. ...


Read More...

Lead Poisoning

Lead poisoning occurs when lead accumulates, often over a period of months or years, in the body. Lead poisoning can be very dangerous to children younger than 6; it can severely affect their mental and physical development. Children may be exposed to lead from lead-based paint that was used in older homes or buildings, or from contact with lead in the air, water, soil or food. Lead poisoning can lead to a variety of health problems in children and, in very high levels, can be fatal. It is recommended that children between the ages of 1 and 2 are tested for lead. ...


Read More...

Learning Disabilities

A learning disability, also referred to as a learning disorder, is a neurological disorder that prevents a child from learning, or significantly impairs the learning process. A learning disability is not a reflection of intelligence, and a child who has one may be of average or above-average intelligence. A child with a learning disability processes information differently from other children, and has difficulty performing specific tasks. A learning disability may affect attention span, coordination, the ability to understand or use spoken or written language or to perform math calculations. ...


Read More...

Ear Infections

Ear infections, also known as otitis media, are one of the most common childhood medical problems. Ear infections are the most frequent cause of doctor visits for children. In fact, three out of four children in the United States will have at least one ear infection by the time they reach the age of three. ...


Read More...

Newborn Screening

Shortly after birth, while still in the hospital, newborn infants are screened for serious genetic and medical conditions. Newborn screening is intended to identify children at increased risk for selected genetic, infectious, or other congenital disorders at the earliest stages. Newborn screenings allow doctors to educate families and ensure that babies with abnormal test results receive additional testing and treatment. With early diagnosis, treatment can begin right away, before serious problems occur or lifelong health problems begin. ...


Read More...

School Physicals

Every student should have an annual physical examination before going back to school to begin the new term. In many states, this medical examination is mandated by law and most schools require that a medical form be filled out before the child is permitted to attend classes. This checkup is necessary for the child's health and well-being and for the health of everyone else in the school environment. A typical physical examination includes the taking of a medical history, an observation and evaluation of posture, stature, mobility, joints and organs, as well as tests for vision and hearing. In many elementary schools, a school physician is available to perform medical examinations, but most students are examined by their private physicians. ...


Read More...

Strep Throat

Strep throat is a bacterial infection of the throat caused by the group A Streptococcus bacteria. This condition is highly contagious and may be spread easily from person to person, especially among family members, in schools and in child care settings. Children between the ages of 5 and 15 years old are commonly affected, however, strep throat can affect people of all ages. Strep throat is commonly treated with antibiotics, but left untreated it may lead to serious complications such as kidney inflammation or rheumatic fever.

...


Read More...

Developmental Screening

A developmental screening is a routine monitoring process used to identify any potential developmental delays in children. Early detection is a valuable tool in terms of treating health and development issues. Developmental screenings can help to identify delays in mental or physical abilities that may indicate a diagnosis of autism, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and other developmental or physical disabilities. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that children be screened for general development at the ages of 9, 18, 24 and 30 months, or whenever a parent has a concern. ...


Read More...

Hives

Hives, also called urticaria, is a common skin condition in which swollen, pale red bumps, also known as welts or wheals, suddenly break out on the skin. Hives cause itching, stinging or burning and may appear anywhere on the body. Hives are most often an allergic reaction, but sometimes the allergen precipitating the adverse reaction is unknown. Hives is never a contagious condition. ...


Read More...

Conjunctivitis

Conjunctivitis, commonly referred to as pink eye, is an infection or inflammation of the conjunctiva, the membrane that lines the eyelid and covers the white part of the eyeball. The inflammation affects the blood vessels in the eye and gives the eye a pink or red appearance. Pink eye can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection, an allergic reaction, a foreign object in the eye or a blocked tear duct. Pink eye can be contagious, so proper diagnosis and prompt treatment are important. ...


Read More...

Influenza

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a contagious viral infection that appears seasonally. It spreads from person to person and can cause mild to severe symptoms. The flu affects the nose, throat and lungs and symptoms may include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, and fatigue. For some people, the flu can lead to serious complications, and possibly even death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), up to 20 percent of Americans gets the flu each year, and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized annually from flu-related complications. Young children, older adults and people with chronic diseases or weakened immune systems are at a higher risk for infection. ...


Read More...

Well Visit

A well visit, also known as a routine physical or medical checkup, is recommended for children of all ages. Regular well visit examinations are important for keeping children healthy and up-to-date on their immunizations. A well visit is also an opportunity to communicate with the doctor about growth and developmental issues and any concerns about a child's overall health. While they may be scheduled more frequently when they are younger, when a child reaches the age of 3, a well care visit should be scheduled annually with a pediatrician. Preventative care is an important part of a healthy lifestyle for a child. ...


Read More...

Flu Vaccination

Influenza, also known as the flu, is a contagious virus that appears seasonally. It spreads from person to person and can cause mild to severe illness. Symptoms of the flu include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills, and fatigue. For some people, the flu can lead to serious complications, and possibly even death. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), up to 20 percent of Americans get the flu each year, and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized annually from flu-related complications. Flu season may start as early as October and usually subsides by May. ...


Read More...

HPV Vaccination

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted viral infection. There are more than 40 different kinds of HPV infections that can infect the genitalia, mouth and throats of men and women. In most cases, the immune system will fight the infection and it will go away on its own, causing no symptoms. In other cases, an HPV infection may lead to genital warts or cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina and anus. ...


Read More...


Back to top
Copyright © 2021 by Dr. Anna Ignaczewska MD and Dr. Leonardo. All Rights Reserved.
Dr. Anna Ignaczewska MD